Hamedah Hasan

Sentenced to 27 years for possession of drugs. Principles in the crime received lesser sentences for cooperating with police Hamedah had no information to trade and received the heaviest sentence.



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Hamedah with her daughter and grandchildren



Hamedah Hasan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
Hamedah Hasan is a notable example of one the many individuals who have been incarcerated due to mandatory sentencing. Hasan describes receiving a longer sentence for a peripheral involvement in a drug ring, than the ring leaders because her peripheral involvement meant she had no information to trade for a lighter sentence. A perceived injustice in her case has attracted the attention of the Interfaith Drug Policy Initiative.[1] She is the subject of a documentary by Melissa Mummert called Perversion of Justice which can be ordered via the website www.perversionofjustice.com.
A mother of two, with one on the way, she moved from Portland, Oregon to her cousins' house in Nebraska to escape an abusive boyfriend. At the time, she was aware that her cousins were selling drugs but she did not take part, except on a few occasions when they asked her to wire money. The house was busted and all adults were arrested. Because Hamedah was not really involved in the drug smuggling, she had no information to trade for a reduced sentence and was given a longer sentence than the conspiracy leaders, a natural life sentence of 27 years. After 10 years Hamedah was able to get her sentence reduced to 12 years, but the ruling was overturned because her judge did not follow the federal sentencing guidelines. With the help of her attorney, Korey Reiman, Hamedah submitted an application for a presidential commutation. Her request was denied in 2008.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamedah_Hasan - Cached
Hamedah Hasan is a notable example of one the many individuals who have been incarcerated due to mandatory sentencing. Hasan describes receiving a ...


Hamedah Hasan: A Letter from Behind Bars on President's Day 
www.huffingtonpost.com/hamedah-hasan/a-letter-from-behin... - Cached
15 Feb 2010 – As much as I am cheering -- even from behind prison bars -- for a reform in the federal laws, I don't want to fall through the cracks. I still have a
...


A Case Study in Priorities: Hamedah Hasan | NAACP 
www.naacp.org/pages/hamedah-hasan - Cached
Hamedah Hasan, a grandmother and mother of 3, she was convicted for playing a peripheral role in a crack cocaine conspiracy headed by a family member.


President Obama: Why no clemency for Hamedah Hasan ... 
communities.washingtontimes.com/.../president-oba... - Cached


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22 Jan 2011 – Obama has called previous sentencing requirements "a disgrace," yet failing to grant clemency to those previously sentenced.
by lisa ruth


Hamedah Hasan, prisoner of the drug war 
www.november.org/thewall/cases/hasan-h/hasan-h.html - Cached
26 Nov 2008 – WASHINGTON --
Hamedah Hasan, a mother and grandmother serving her 17th year of a 27-year federal prison sentence for a non-violent ...



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Hamedah Hasan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Hamedah Hasan is a notable example of one the many individuals who have been incarcerated due to mandatory sentencing. Hasan describes receiving a longer sentence for a peripheral involvement in a drug ring, than the ring leaders because her peripheral involvement meant she had no information to trade for a lighter sentence. A perceived injustice in her case has attracted the attention of the Interfaith Drug Policy Initiative.[1] She is the subject of a documentary by Melissa Mummert called Perversion of Justice which can be ordered via the website www.perversionofjustice.com.

A mother of two, with one on the way, she moved from Portland, Oregon to her cousins' house in Nebraska to escape an abusive boyfriend. At the time, she was aware that her cousins were selling drugs but she did not take part, except on a few occasions when they asked her to wire money. The house was busted and all adults were arrested. Because Hamedah was not really involved in the drug smuggling, she had no information to trade for a reduced sentence and was given a longer sentence than the conspiracy leaders, a natural life sentence of 27 years. After 10 years Hamedah was able to get her sentence reduced to 12 years, but the ruling was overturned because her judge did not follow the federal sentencing guidelines. With the help of her attorney, Korey Reiman, Hamedah submitted an application for a presidential commutation. Her request was denied in 2008.